Greg Girard – Kowloon Walled City

Greg Girard (born 1955) is a Canadian photographer whose work has examined the social and physical transformation in Asia’s largest cities for more than three decades.

Greg Girard – Wikipedia

The full gallery can be seen here and the book can be purchased here.

Updated and expanded new volume, picking up where “City of Darkness: Life in Kowloon Walled City”, published in 1993, left off.

The Kowloon Walled City was a singular Hong Kong phenomenon: 33,000 people living in over 300 interconnected high-rise buildings, built without the contributions of a single architect, ungoverned by Hong Kong’s safety and health regulations, covering one square city block in a densely populated neighborhood near the end of the runway at Kai Tak airport. In collaboration with Ian Lambot, I spent five years photographing and becoming familiar with the Walled City, its residents, and how it was organized. So seemingly compromised and anarchic on its surface, it actually worked -and to a large extent, worked well. The Walled City was torn down in 1992 but the photographs, oral histories, maps and essays in our updated new book, released in 2014, provide the most thorough record of daily life in that extraordinary place.

Fron Greg Girard’s website – CITY of DARKNESS REVISITED

I landed Girard’s work while researching on the Kowloon Walled City:

Kowloon Walled City was an ungoverned, densely populated settlement in Kowloon CityHong Kong. Originally a Chinese military fort, the Walled City became an enclave after the New Territories were leased to the UK by China in 1898. Its population increased dramatically following the Japanese occupation of Hong Kong during World War II. By 1990, the walled city contained 50,000 residents[1][2] within its 2.6-hectare (6.4-acre) borders. From the 1950s to the 1970s, it was controlled by local triads and had high rates of prostitutiongambling and drug abuse.

Kowloon Walled City – Wikipedia

The rest of Greg’s work is also outstanding, check it out on his site.

Power Plant, Ordos, China – Greg Girard

Responder

Introduce tus datos o haz clic en un icono para iniciar sesión:

Logo de WordPress.com

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de WordPress.com. Cerrar sesión /  Cambiar )

Google photo

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Google. Cerrar sesión /  Cambiar )

Imagen de Twitter

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Twitter. Cerrar sesión /  Cambiar )

Foto de Facebook

Estás comentando usando tu cuenta de Facebook. Cerrar sesión /  Cambiar )

Conectando a %s